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We provide legal representation in the areas of civil rights, criminal law, family law, divorce, & child custody disputes in New Jersey & New York and Federal courts.
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Tel.: (718) 376-6466
Fax: (718) 376-3033

1123 Avenue Z Brooklyn, NY 11235

arkady.bukh@yahoo.com
 
October
26 Friday
2007

Bogus New York dentist charged with reckless endangerment

NEW YORK: A fake dentist is accused of dumping a critically ill woman on the curb outside his New York office after she lost consciousness during surgery, prosecutors said Friday.

Alexander Poperetchny, 47, pleaded not guilty to reckless endangerment and unauthorized practice at his arraignment Thursday.

The patient, Villimin Colleti, 71, was taken to Coney Island Hospital suffering from heart and brain damage, said the office of Brooklyn District Attorney Charles J. Hynes. She fell unconscious while in the dental chair Tuesday at Poperetchny's office, the statement. It was not immediately clear what caused her to become ill.

Poperetchny's attorney, Arkady Bukh, said his client was a dental technician and did not perform any procedure requiring a dental license. He said the practice did have a licensed dentist on staff.

Poperetchny called emergency services when the woman passed out, Bukh said.

 

August
16 Thursday
2007

NY prosecutors: Bush`s friend a target of Russian`s ID theft gold scam

NEW YORK: A Russian con artist posing as presidential pal Charles J. Wyly Jr. ordered a new checkbook from the Texas billionaire's bank account and wrote a $7 million (?5.22 million) check for a pile of gold, U.S. authorities said Thursday.
Igor Klopov orchestrated the identify theft scheme from his home in Moscow, where he used his computer to mine Web sites for financial data about Wyly and other wealthy Americans, Manhattan prosecutors said. Klopov and four accomplices were charged with stealing $1.5 million (?1.12 million) and attempting to rip off another $10.7 million (?8 million) in a case prosecutors said demonstrates the risks of easy access to personal information on the Internet.
Klopov, snared in a sting operation in May, and the four other defendants, arrested Thursday in Michigan, Florida, Texas and Kentucky, were charged with grand larceny, money laundering and other crimes. If convicted, they each could face up to 25 years in prison.
Defense attorney Bukh Arkady said Klopov, 24, is "willing to cooperate with the government," adding, "His family in Russia is very concerned."
An attorney for Wyly did not immediately respond to a telephone message seeking comment.
Wyly, 73, and his brother, Sam, headed the world's largest arts and crafts chain, Michaels Stores Inc., before the Irving, Texas-based company was sold last year for $6 billion. The brothers also are known as stalwart Republican Party benefactors and close patrons of President George W. Bush.
An indictment alleges that Klopov picked his victims from the Forbes 400 list, then tapped into online databases to collect information "about the value of property, size of outstanding mortgages and existing lines of credit," prosecutor James Kindler said at a news conference.
Klopov then hired his co-conspirators to help forge documents and raid bank accounts, an operation financed with stolen credit cards, prosecutors said.
In December 2005, prosecutors said, Klopov was able to order the sale of $1 million (?750,000) of stock held by a couple in California, then persuade the brokerage to wire the proceeds to his bank account by having an accomplice hand-deliver a forged authorization letter. In other cases, they said, the co-conspirators were turned away from banks after seeking to withdraw hundreds of thousands of dollars from victims' accounts using fake identifications and doctored documents.
The scheme began to unravel last November, when a Westchester County gold dealer contacted Wyly's bank about the $7 million (?5.22 million) check. Wyly denied writing it.
Undercover investigators posing as accomplices contacted Klopov and convinced him the transaction had gone through. Authorities "even arranged to have a picture of (an undercover) taken with the gold bars, which was e-mailed to Klopov as proof of purchase," Kindler said.
In May, Klopov agreed to come to the United States to retrieve the gold, prosecutors said.
The undercover officers met him in the Dominican Republic and flew with him by private jet to New York, where he was arrested.
June
20 Wednesday
2007

Prosecutor says at New York trial FBI sting stopped arms dealers

NEW YORK: An Armenian immigrant accused of plotting to sell military weapons to an FBI informant posing as an arms dealer went on trial Wednesday, with a prosecutor saying he was greedy for easy money and his defense lawyer saying he merely wanted a green card to work in the United States.

Artur Solomonyan and five others were accused of agreeing to obtain deadly weapons from people with access to weapons in the former Soviet Union, Assistant U.S. Attorney David Massey said.

"The defendants saw these deadly weapons as a way to make a quick buck," Massey said.

An indictment accused Solomonyan and others of conspiring between December 2003 and March 2005 to import shoulder-fired surface-to-air missiles, rocket-propelled grenade launchers, anti-tank guided missiles and machine guns without a license.

When prosecutors first announced the case, they said the FBI agent was posing as a middleman for terrorists. But Massey made no mention of that Wednesday.

Massey said the jury in U.S. District Court in Manhattan would hear the defendants using code words to refer to weapons on some of the thousands of tape-recorded telephone calls captured by the government during its investigation.

He said the arms delivered in New York, Los Angeles and Miami before the men were arrested included eight assault weapons, a machine gun and three high-powered rifles.

Solomonyan lawyer Seth Ginsberg said his client knew nothing about importing weapons when a government informant dangled the possibility of getting a green card to stay in the United States if he could arrange some weapons sales.

He said Solomonyan had no intention of importing weapons but just wanted to string along the informant long enough to get a green card.

"If the world had more arms dealers like Artur Solomonyan, the world would be a much safer place," Ginsberg said.

He said his client produced an outdated price list for weapons as a way to keep the informant working on his green card.

"Artur Solomonyan is not an arms dealer," he said.

The trial was delayed once before when the government informant, Kelly Davis, was hospitalized with stomach and chest pains and put on suicide watch.

Massey said the case began when one of the defendants approached Davis to ask about the sale of machine guns.

The prosecutor said Davis reported the offer to law enforcement, which initiated an investigation as Davis began making recordings, generating hundreds of pages of reports.

Solomonyan was charged with arms trafficking conspiracy, firearms trafficking conspiracy, interstate firearms trafficking and illegal transfer and possession of a machine gun in March 2005. If convicted, some defendants could face up to life in prison.

March
12 Monday
2007

New weapons trafficking trial

NEW YORK: A new trial for an Armenian immigrant accused of plotting to sell military weapons to an FBI informant posing as a middleman for terrorists has been scheduled after the government's key witness was put on suicide watch and admitted to a psychiatric facility.

Opening statements in the trial of Artur Solomonyan and six others were supposed to begin Monday, but a mistrial was declared and a new trial was scheduled for June after prosecutors revealed the twist in the case.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Christopher Conniff told Judge Richard J. Holwell on Thursday that the witness, Kelly Davis, had been hospitalized with stomach and chest pains and put on a suicide watch the previous weekend, according to a transcript of the proceeding.

Last Wednesday, Conniff said, Davis entered himself into an inpatient psychiatric facility for evaluation.

Conniff offered to continue the trial without him, but defense lawyers insisted on a mistrial, saying they would want to call Davis as a witness if the government did not.

A week ago, Conniff had told the judge that the case began when one of seven defendants approached Davis to ask about the sale of machine guns.

The prosecutor said Davis reported the offer to law enforcement, which initiated an investigation as Davis began making consensual recordings, generating hundreds of pages of reports. Conniff said the FBI paid Davis $55,000 during the probe, including some money for expenses.

Defense lawyers complained that they had been given very little information about Davis, prompting Conniff to reveal that Davis came to the United States in the late 1990s, that he is a U.S. permanent resident and that he has a South African driver's license.

A Solomonyan lawyer, Seth Ginsberg, complained to the judge that the prosecutors' description of their dealings with Davis was difficult to believe.

"I don't think there is an attorney in this room who is familiar with an informant in a case that came forward out of an altruistic sense of civic duty," he said.

Ginsberg said in an interview Monday that the defendants were looking forward to the new trial.

"We anticipate going forward in June with that witness, who we believe will be critical to the defense of our case," he said. "We're confident we'll prevail under any circumstances, but we would prefer to have a live witness to cross- examine."

Solomonyan was charged with arms trafficking conspiracy, firearms trafficking conspiracy, interstate firearms trafficking and illegal transfer and possession of a machine gun in March 2005. Prosecutors say he was recorded on wiretaps talking with associates in the United States and the former Soviet Union about obtaining the military weapons.

An indictment accused Solomonyan and others of conspiring between December 2003 and March 2005 to import shoulder-fired surface-to-air missiles, rocket-propelled grenade launchers, anti-tank guided missiles and machine guns without a license.

Some of the defendants could face up to life in prison if convicted of the most serious charges.