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We provide legal representation in the areas of civil rights, criminal law, family law, divorce, & child custody disputes in New Jersey & New York and Federal courts.
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Tel.: (718) 376-6466
Fax: (718) 376-3033

1123 Avenue Z Brooklyn, NY 11235

arkady.bukh@yahoo.com
 
May
05 Wednesday
2010

Brooklyn Health Care Fraud

WASHINGTON, May 5 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Four Brooklyn, N.Y.-area residents have been charged in connection with a health care fraud scheme operated out of the Solstice Wellness Center, a Brooklyn-area clinic that purported to specialize in providing physical therapy and various diagnostic tests, announced the Departments of Justice and Health and Human Services (HHS).

Solstice executive Dmitry Shteyman, 35, and Solstice employees Aleksey Shteyman, 41; Maxsim Shvedkin, 38; and Sara Kalantarov, 22, were each charged in an indictment unsealed today in U.S. District Court in the Eastern District of New York, with conspiracy to defraud the United States, to submit and cause the submission of false claims and to pay health care kickbacks. In addition, Dmitry Shteyman, Aleksey Shteyman and Shvedkin were each indicted on one count of conspiracy to commit health care fraud and 16 counts of health care fraud. Dmitry Shteyman, Shvedkin and Kalantarov were arrested today in the Eastern District of New York. Aleksey Shteyman remains at large.

According to the indictment, Dmitry Shteyman was the chief operating officer and vice president of Solstice, Aleksey Shteyman was a consultant at Solstice, Shvedkin assisted in the recruitment of Medicare beneficiaries at Solstice, and Kalantarov was an employee at Solstice who worked at the front desk. All four individuals are alleged to have been involved in paying cash kickbacks to Medicare beneficiaries to induce those beneficiaries to be transported to and from Solstice, to purportedly receive physicians' services, physical therapy and diagnostic tests. The false and fraudulent claims that were submitted to Medicare were for services that were not actually rendered and that were not medically necessary.

The charge of conspiracy to defraud the United States, to submit and cause the submission of false claims, and to pay health care kickbacks carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000, per count. The charges of conspiracy to commit health care fraud and health care fraud each carry a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine, per count.

An indictment is merely a charge and the defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

Today's charges were announced by Assistant Attorney General of the Criminal Division Lanny A. Breuer, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York Loretta E. Lynch and Daniel R. Levinson, Inspector General of HHS.

The case is being prosecuted by Trial Attorneys Katherine Houston and Steven Kim of the Criminal Division's Fraud Section. HHS Office of the Inspector General (HHS-OIG), the Office of the New York Attorney General's Medicaid Fraud Control Unit, and the New York Office of the Medicaid Inspector General conducted the investigation. The case was brought as part of the Medicare Fraud Strike Force, supervised by the Criminal Division's Fraud Section and the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of New York.

Since their inception in March 2007, Strike Force operations in seven districts have obtained indictments of more than 560 individuals who collectively have falsely billed the Medicare program for more than $1.2 billion. In addition, the HHS Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, working in conjunction with the HHS-OIG, are taking steps to increase accountability and decrease the presence of fraudulent providers.

To learn more about the Health Care Fraud Prevention and Enforcement Action Team (HEAT), go to: www.stopmedicarefraud.gov

SOURCE U.S. Department of Justice

February
25 Friday
2011

Belarussian pleads guilty in federal identity theft case

In June 2007, Belarussian nationals Dmitry M. Naskovets and Sergey Semashko (also referred to as “Semasko” in some Department of Justice reports) created CallService.biz (“CallService”), a Russian language online business hosted in Lithuania. Unfortunately, that mundane start to this story doesn’t continue along such an innocuous path. To the contrary, this online business venture takes us over to the dark side.

Naskovets and Semashko created CallService with the intention of assisting identity thieves to exploit stolen financial information, such as credit card and debit card numbers. CallService was designed to thwart the security measures put in place by financial institutions.  

Yes, I speak the Englishes wellfully

In exchange for a fee, Naskovets and Semashko provided through CallService the services of English- and German-speaking individuals to persons who had stolen account and biographical information. On the front-end of this transaction, the identity thief provided:

  • the name of the bank to be contacted;
  • the stolen account information;
  • the stolen biographical information; and
  • instructions as to what to say or how the fraudulent transaction was to be conducted.

Thereafter, Naskovets and his co-conspirators would assign someone of the same gender and who spoke the same language as the authorized account holder. CallService’s foreign language speakers would pose as the authorized account holders and telephone financial institutions and other businesses in order to conduct or confirm fraudulent account activity on behalf of the identity thieves. If successful, the CallService employees would, among other criminal acts:

  • confirm unauthorized withdrawals or transfers from bank accounts,
  • unblock accounts, and
  • change the address or phone number associated with an account.

After the requested call was made, Naskovets and his co-conspirators reported back to the identity thief and awaited further instructions.

Our Toll Free Number Is

CallService posted advertisements for its services on other websites used by identity thieves, including CardingWorld.cc, which was operated by Semashko.  One such advertisement noted “a special offer of an unlimited number of confirmation calls” to interested individuals, among which were listed “successful Carders (drop handlers . . . PIN cashers, etc.). . .” Other advertisements boasted that CallService had “over 2090 people working with” it and had “done over 5400 confirmation calls” to banks, referencing calls to defeat security screening procedures and confirm or conduct fraudulent transactions.

May
10 Thursday
2012

The \\\'Not-So-Good\\\' Good Life Of A Russian Hacker

Judging by the pictures on his VKontake social networking page, Vladislav Khorokhorin (or Horohorin in phonetic English) has a pretty good view of the French countryside in Aix-en-Provence. It’s the kind of town that — if it were allowed — companies would have bottled up the pristine air and sold it for a premium. There is Vladislav in aviator glasses holding his smartphone with the rolling blue hills of southern France behind him. Oh, but wait. He’s behind bars. The Russian alleged hacker is suffering there with his Angry Birds and his 24-hour access to all things digital while holed up in a French prison de luxe. Vladislav’s been living there for nearly two years, a defendant in one of the hottest litigated cyber crime cases in the world. The prosecution: the U.S. Department of Justice. Vladislav Khorokhorin was picked up in Nice, France in August 2010 by a combined agency effort of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the U.S. Secret Service for his alleged role in U.S. credit card theft as leader of a gang called CarderPlanet. To the U.S. Department of Justice, Vladislav is “BadB”, the 27 year old multi-million dollar leader of the pack. Only, to one of his lawyers, Arkady Bukh in New York, Vladislav is definitely not “BadB”.
April
24 Tuesday
2012

Russia\'s Million Dollar Hackers

Few nationalities are as good at making money from hacking than the Russians. Their share of the global cyber crime market, an estimated $12.5 billion black market, doubled last year to $4.5 billion, according to Moscow-based Group-IB, a cyber security services firm working mainly with the Russian government and banks to help reduce online fraud. (See infographics here.)

The Russians are hacking into your computer and your cell phone and they’re making millions as a result.

Earlier this year, Facebook blew the cover off the malware gang Koobface. All five of their members were Russians from St. Petersburg. Eugene Kapersky, the CEO of software security firm Kaspersky Lab, also based in Moscow, said that the Koobface gang had become millionaires thanks to their hacking skills.

“The cybercrime market originating from Russia costs the global economy billions of dollars every year,” said Ilya Sachkov, Group-IB’s CEO. “Although the Russian government has taken some very positive steps, we think it needs to go further by changing existing law enforcement practices, establishing proper international cooperation and ultimately improving the number of solved computer crimes.”

February
25 Friday
2011

Belarussian pleads guilty in federal identity theft case

In June 2007, Belarussian nationals Dmitry M. Naskovets and Sergey Semashko (also referred to as “Semasko” in some Department of Justice reports) created CallService.biz (“CallService”), a Russian language online business hosted in Lithuania. Unfortunately, that mundane start to this story doesn’t continue along such an innocuous path. To the contrary, this online business venture takes us over to the dark side.

Naskovets and Semashko created CallService with the intention of assisting identity thieves to exploit stolen financial information, such as credit card and debit card numbers. CallService was designed to thwart the security measures put in place by financial institutions.